Chardhi Kala One Year After Oak Creek: Sikh Faith Healing Community (VIDEO)

August 2, 2013

One year after a hate-motivated gun massacre  August 5, 2012, at the Sikh gurdwara in Oak Creek, WI., took the lives of six and critically wounded four more, a profound faith is working in mysterious ways. Devastating is a word falling short to fully describe that assault on the dignity of life. Through heartache and victimization of the worst kind, the Sikh community survives, heals, and empathizes with unity through their sacred practice of Chardhi Khala, maintaining  eternal optimism no matter what strikes. In that spirit, the community invites all to act on their solidarity and join a 6k  walk and run on August 3, 2013, to practice Chardhi Kala in memorial.
Trying to grasp this in text might be difficult.  This isn’t easy either, but important, to honor those lost and those still healing, to watch the short film “One Year Later” and understand the social consequences when hate running rampant meets a violence-plagued country. Join the Council for a Parliament of the World’s Religions in identifying what interfaith can do to empower us all to transform hate into loving neighborly relationships  From online to on the ground: Chicago,  Long Island, New York, and soon to this very gurdwara.
“Turning Tragedy Into Triumph”
Oak Creek, Wisconsin
August 3, 2013
In memory of those lost August 5, 2012
chardhikala.org
In honor of the six lives lost on August 5, 2012, and the millions of “others” who died for their differences.
Featured image courtesy of YouTube


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