Beverley Jacobs

Beverley lives and practices law at her home community of Six Nations of the Grand River Territory in Southern Ontario. She has completed an interdisciplinary PhD at the University of Calgary that included Law (Human Rights and Indigenous Legal Traditions), Indigenous Wholistic Health and Indigenous Research Methodologies. Bev has obtained a Bachelor of Law Degree from the University of Windsor in 1994 and a Masters of Law Degree from the University of Saskatchewan in 2000. She is an Assistant Professor at the Faculty of Law, University of Windsor. Beverly is also a consultant/researcher/writer/public speaker and she is a former President of the Native Women’s Association of Canada (elected 2004 to 2009). Bev’s passion is about peacefulness and safety of Indigenous peoples. For the past 25 or so years, much of her work has focussed on anti-violence work, restoring Indigenous traditions, values, beliefs and laws and decolonizing Eurocentric law. She continues to advocate for families of missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls and to educate the public about the history and impacts of colonization, which has resulted in the historic traumas that are occurring to Indigenous peoples, specifically Indigenous women and girls today. Most recently, on December 1, 2016, Beverly received a Franco-German Prize for Human Rights and the Rule of Law from the Governments of France and Germany for her human rights fight for the issues relating to missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls in Canada. She is mother of Ashley and grandmother of Nicholas (16), Tessa (14), Bryson (9) and Kenna (7). She is partner to Patrick Sandy, Mohawk Nation, Turtle Clan.


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Land Acknowledgment

The Parliament of the World's Religions acknowledges it is situated on the traditional homelands of the Bodéwadmik (Potawatomi), Hoocąk (Winnebago/Ho’Chunk), Jiwere (Otoe), Nutachi (Missouria), and Baxoje (Iowas); Kiash Matchitiwuk (Menominee); Meshkwahkîha (Meskwaki); Asâkîwaki (Sauk); Myaamiaki (Miami), Waayaahtanwaki (Wea), and Peeyankihšiaki (Piankashaw); Kiikaapoi (Kickapoo); Inoka (Illini Confederacy); Anishinaabeg (Ojibwe), and Odawak (Odawa).

PoWR recognizes the region we now call Chicago remains home to a diversity of Indigenous peoples today and this land upon which we walk, live, and play continues to be Indigenous land.


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